The 100 Influential Georgia Muslims

August 25, 2014

ACLU is proud of Azadeh Shahshahani and the work that she has accomplished.

http://www.100gamuslims.com/index.php/2014-honorees

The 100 Influential Georgia Muslims is an initiative of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta. She will be honored at The 100 Influential Georgia Muslims Gala on Saturday, September 20, 2014 @ 6:30pm.

For more information

Georgia teams up with ICE to target Latinos

August 18, 2014

Aljazerra America
By Azadeh Shahshahani

In June 2011 while traveling on Lawrenceville Highway in Gwinnett County, Georgia, Bonnie Horton and her husband were stopped at a roadblock and surrounded by uniformed officers and police vehicles. Bonnie remembers seeing at least five cars pulled over on the side of the road and young children and babies in at least two of those cars.

All cars proceeding on that road were stopped at the roadblock. Most cars stopped for about a minute. As Bonnie and her husband approached the roadblock, they had their windows rolled down. She witnessed a man being taken out of one of the cars by officers, possibly being arrested. Alongside the same car stood a woman with a baby. Another car next to theirs had drivers and passengers inside who appeared to be Latino. She heard an officer asking them to provide proof of citizenship. However, Bonnie and her husband, who are Caucasian, were only asked to show proof of insurance and residence in Gwinnett County. They showed their driver’s licenses as evidence of residency, and were allowed to proceed without incident.

ACLU and the Art of Community

August 05, 2014

by Philip Painchaud and Mitun Mitra
ACLU of Georgia Law Clerks

On Saturday, July 12th, Marlyn Tillman, Mitun Mitra, Philip Painchaud and Asia Foots attended a celebration of the University Avenue Public Art Project on behalf of the ACLU of Georgia. The event took place in southwest Atlanta, and celebrated the unveiling of three twenty-foot high-relief sculptures celebrating the past, present and future of the local neighborhoods. Those in attendance were happy to see the presence of the ACLU of Georgia.


Advocates Say Georgia Law Enforcement is Profiling, Increasing Immigrant Arrests

August 01, 2014

90.1FM WABE
Lisa George

A group of advocates for immigrants to Georgia says there has been a dramatic rise in the number of arrests and detainments of immigrants in the last few years.

Alicia Cruz says she was pulled over in Conyers about four months ago.

(Cruz speaks in Spanish followed by voice of translator): “My kids were with me, and the police officers kneeled my children down and pointed them, gun-pointed them.”

Cruz speaks very little English and says the officer spoke no Spanish. She says the officer took her to jail for driving without a license. She is currently out on bond, but she is undocumented and fears she will be detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

New Report Details Prejudice and Pretext in Georgia's Hyper Immigration Enforcement

July 31, 2014

Federal ICE Access Programs and GA HB87 Driving Unprecedented Targeting and Deportation in the State

Today advocacy organizations publish a new report based on data made available through FOIA litigation with the state and federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement that both outline the metastasizing growth of local police's involvement in immigration enforcement and the resulting patterns of prejudice and collateral deportation in local practice with little to no evidence of any relation to actual public safety efforts.

The data reveals that the federal agency's practice of requesting the extended incarceration of an individual because of the suspicion of the immigration status known as ICE detainers rose 17,169% from 2007 to 2013 with 96% of those targeted being of "dark or medium complexion."

Previously Unreleased Data Shows Prejudice Not Public Safety in Georgia's Hyper Enforcement of Immigration Law

July 29, 2014

FOIA Suit Results in Telling Picture of Local Law Enforcement's Involvement in Federal Policies

What: Press Conference Releasing New Study "Prejudice, Policing, and Public Safety"
Where:180 Spring Street SW
When: 11:00am, Thursday July 31st, 2014
Who: Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights, ACLU of Georgia, and Georgia #Not1More Campaign

On Thursday morning, advocates will release a new study analyzing data received as a result of a FOIA lawsuit with ICE that outlines for the first time the practice and impact of local immigration enforcement efforts that grew under federal programs and the state law passed in 2011.

Families victimized by unjust deportation policy will speak out as part of the Georgia #Not1More campaign seeking to move Dekalb and Fulton Counties to join more than 130 jurisdictions nationwide in rejecting the ICE hold requests to keep people in extended detention due to its negative impact on public safety and constitutional violations.

The report will be made available at the press conference.

The ACLU of Georgia and Civil Liberties Coalition Urge Atlanta City Council to ‎Adopt Reasonable Limitations on Police Use of Drones

July 18, 2014

The ACLU of Georgia was joined yesterday by a civil liberties coalition asking the Atlanta City Council to adopt reasonable limitations on the governmental use of drones for surveillance. To find out more about the effort, see our fact sheet here.

License plate scanners are lowering traffic violations - ACLU says it invades your privacy

July 18, 2014

NBC 26
Kasey Greenhalgh

It's a crime-fighting tool that comes with controversy. The American Civil Liberties Union says they’re concerned about driver’s private information being easily accessible once their tags are scanned.


Chad Brock is the Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Georgia.


There have been instances throughout the country in which this type of information is being shared. We'll consider sending an opens records request to try to get a little bit more information about how they intend to use this, what kind of policies are in place to prohibit this type of information being used in the way that violates the privacy or rights of these individuals," said Brock.

Atlanta City Council eyes drone regulations

July 18, 2014

A civil liberties coalition including the ACLU of Georgia met with the Atlanta City Council yesterday to advocate for adoption of regulations on use of drones by law enforcement.

The military uses them to track down the enemy. Law enforcement agencies around the country deploy them to catch criminals.

Justine Story, a homeowner in northeast Atlanta, hates the idea of robotic eyes flying over metro Atlanta watching everyday citizens.

"I wouldn't want a drone looking in my bedroom window," Story said.

Supporters of drones contend the technology can be a powerful tool for fighting crime and terrorism.

Critics say drones can intrude on the privacy of the law-abiding public.

Limit the abusive Use of SWAT

July 09, 2014

SUPPORT THIS PETITION

Georgia State Legislature

Declare an emergency session of the State Legislature to limit the use of SWAT to situations in which it's truly necessary to save a life. We cannot wait till the next regular session in 2015.

Outrageous! Police should serve and protect our communities, not wage war on the people who live in them.

Nearly 80% of the SWAT raids the ACLU studied* were to serve search warrants, usually in drug cases. SWAT teams are forcing their way into people’s homes, often in the middle of the night, using paramilitary weapons and tactics and doing needless damage to people and property. Poor communities and communities of color bear the brunt of this unnecessary force.

It does not have to be this way. We can make sure that police honor their mission to protect and serve, by ensuring that hyper-aggressive military tools and tactics are only used in situations that are truly “high risk.”

Right now, a twenty-month-old toddler named Baby Bou Bou is recovering after a flashbang grenade thrown by a SWAT officer in Georgia exploded in his crib. The grenade blew a hole in his chest that has yet to heal. Doctors are still unable to fully assess lasting brain damage. This unnecessary tragedy demands immediate action.

Community members, faith leaders, and elected officials across the aisles are building a movement to limit the use of SWAT to situations in which such aggressive tactics are truly necessary to save a life. This would be the first effort of its kind and set a precedent for other states.

We need to let the Georgia legislature know that people across the country are watching. Baby Bou Bou’s case is one of many casualties of a drug war that is being fought with heavy artillery and waning public support, mainly in poor communities and communities of color. If we can urge Georgia to pass a landmark bill, that will be a crucial first step in the right direction to limit the excessive use of SWAT across the country.

Will you call on the Georgia state legislature to address this problem now, before more kids lose their lives because of this excessive militarization?

Sign the Petition!