Dekalb County Sheriff Rejects Unconstitutional Detention Per ICE Requests Georgia

For Immediate Release

DeKalb County Sheriff Rejects Unconstitutional Detention per ICE Requests
Georgia #Not1More Looks to Prevent Future ICE Abuses

Members of the Georgia #Not1More coalition today announced the latest victory in their efforts to end unconstitutional detention per ICE detainer requests in Georgia.

DeKalb County Sheriff Jeffrey L. Mann has announced that, effective immediately, he will end submission to federal detainer requests, a centerpiece of the failed Secure Communities deportation quota program, without a warrant or other sufficie

“I requested and received a legal review of this practice,” said Sheriff Mann. “The law does not allow us to hold anyone without probable cause. If our judicial system determines that an individual should no longer be held in custody, it is not in my authority to countermand that decision. We all benefit from a nation of laws that regulate the ways people can be detained, and we should be grateful that is the case.”

Representatives of the Georgia #Not1More coalition welcomed the Sheriff’s announcement and will continue to carefully monitor the implementation of the DHS initiative replacing Secure Communities, Priority Enforcement Program (PEP), due to fundamental concerns with police-ICE collaboration exemplified in previous ICE experiments.   

“Rejecting ICE’s detainer requests makes all Georgians safer and brings DeKalb County policy in line with the Constitution. We’re glad to see Sheriff Mann taking proactive measures to address the harm to both public safety and community trust in law enforcement that involvement in federal deportation efforts has caused. We will continue to work with the Sheriff to create a bright line between law enforcement and federal deportation efforts to protect our families and prevent ICE programs from violating anyone’s rights regardless of what new name the agency gives to its quota pursuits.”  –Adelina Nicholls, Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights (GLAHR).

 “SONG and the Georgia #Not1More coalition are heartened by this decision, and we hope that Sheriff Mann’s action on this reflects further commitment on behalf of the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Department to work with immigrant communities and our allies post-implementation.  We have directly experienced the harm inflicted on our communities by ICE, and with the recent political maneuvers at the federal level, it is increasingly important for our communities to remain vigilant and aware of how this implementation will happen in Georgia.” – Paulina Helm-Hernandez, Southerners On New Ground (SONG).

 “We Commend Sheriff Mann for putting an end to the unconstitutional practice of prolonging individuals’ detention per ICE detainer requets.  This action is sure to increase community trust in the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Department. Going forward, we will monitor the implementation of the new DHS program, PEP, and will document and take action on any violations resulting from continued local law enforcement entanglement with ICE.” – Azadeh Shahshahani, ACLU of Georgia. 

 Georgia #Not1More coalition is a coalition made up of: Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights (GLAHR), Southerners On New Ground (SONG), US Human Rights Network, ACLU of Georgia, Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), Jobs with Justice, Georgia WAND, Racial Action Justice Center, coalicion de lideres latinos-CLILA, National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON), Southeastern Immigrant Rights Network (SEIRN), Women Watch Afrika, Project South, Metro Atlanta Democratic Socialists of America, Georgia Detention Watch, GA Moral Mondays, and Atlanta American Friends Service Committee.

 

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The ACLU of Georgia and Civil Liberties Coalition Urge Atlanta City Council to ‎Adopt Reasonable Limitations on Police Use of Drones

The ACLU of Georgia was joined yesterday by a civil liberties coalition asking the Atlanta City Council to adopt reasonable limitations on the governmental use of drones for surveillance. To find out more about the effort, see our fact sheet here.

License plate scanners are lowering traffic violations - ACLU says it invades your privacy

NBC 26
Kasey Greenhalgh

It's a crime-fighting tool that comes with controversy. The American Civil Liberties Union says they’re concerned about driver’s private information being easily accessible once their tags are scanned.


Chad Brock is the Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Georgia.


There have been instances throughout the country in which this type of information is being shared. We'll consider sending an opens records request to try to get a little bit more information about how they intend to use this, what kind of policies are in place to prohibit this type of information being used in the way that violates the privacy or rights of these individuals," said Brock.

Atlanta City Council eyes drone regulations

A civil liberties coalition including the ACLU of Georgia met with the Atlanta City Council yesterday to advocate for adoption of regulations on use of drones by law enforcement.

The military uses them to track down the enemy. Law enforcement agencies around the country deploy them to catch criminals.

Justine Story, a homeowner in northeast Atlanta, hates the idea of robotic eyes flying over metro Atlanta watching everyday citizens.

"I wouldn't want a drone looking in my bedroom window," Story said.

Supporters of drones contend the technology can be a powerful tool for fighting crime and terrorism.

Critics say drones can intrude on the privacy of the law-abiding public.

UGA athlete policies address sex, appearance and cleanliness

11Alive Staff, WXIA

The University of Georgia men's basketball team must follow detailed rules when it comes to dating, as uncovered by the study, shows that Coach Mark Fox includes guidelines on sexual activities, appearances and social networking.

Included under the "Treat women with respect" heading are rules stating "Don't spend all your energy in bed all night," "Hicky's/passion marks should not ever be noticed by coaches" and "One. Not two or three girlfriends."

Social media networking rules state that anything the athletes write can be quote by the coach. Players are forbidden from Twitter unless they have written permission from Coach Fox.

Players are also told that their apartments and dorms are expected to be clean. "We're paying so we're inspecting. I can enter the dorm at any time," the policy states.

Sagging pants and braids are also prohibited, according to the policy.

Georgia may soon drug test food stamp recipients

By Ned Resnikoff
www.msnbc.com

Just before the close of Georgia’s 2014 legislative session last week, the state’s General Assembly granted final approval to a law that would allow state workers to drug test food stamp recipients. The law, H.B. 772, now awaits the signature of Gov. Nathan Deal, a Republican.

An earlier version of the bill would have made drug testing mandatory for all food stamp recipients, but members of the House changed the bill’s wording after a federal judge ruled that a similar law in Florida violated the Fourth Amendment. To avoid the same fate, H.B. 772 was rewritten to require “reasonable suspicion” that a food stamp recipient was using illegal drugs before caseworkers could order a drug test.

Law and Ethics of Intersex Issues & Screening of Intersexion, a Documentary

The Law and Ethics of Intersex Issues & Screening of Intersexion a Documentary screening brought to you by OUTLAW & ALLIES at Atlanta John Marshall Law School and the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia.

Saturday, March 29, 2014 from 4:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Blackburn Center.

Roe v Wade 41st Anniversary

January 22nd marks the 41st anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that guaranteed reproductive freedom for all women and enhanced the privacy protections of all Americans. While it is unfortunate that reproductive freedom is still under attack 40 years later, we would like you to know that the ACLU and the ACLU of Georgia remain vigilant in our support of reproductive freedom and respect for the personal autonomy of all women.

In the courts...

In 2012, the ACLU of Georgia and the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project filed a lawsuit against the State of Georgia, seeking to prevent the State from implementing a 20-week abortion ban. In December 2012, the Fulton County Superior Court issued an injunction against the law as it applies to pre-viable abortion care and the injunction remains in effect today. By bringing this suit, we prevented this anti-choice law from infringing upon the rights that Georgia women are guaranteed underRoeand we are confident that the Georgia courts will find this law unconstitutional.

With Drug Tests for Florida Welfare Recipients On Hold, Georgia Waits

Lisa George
90.1 WABE

Georgia public policy players are watching Florida closely now that a federal judge there has struck down the state’s law requiring drug testing for welfare recipients.

A U.S. District judge ruled the Florida law violates the Constitutional provision against unreasonable searches. Georgia has had a similar law on the books since 2012, but it has not yet been implemented.

Chad Brock, an attorney with the ACLU of Georgia, says he wouldn’t be surprised if the State of Florida appeals the ruling to the Eleventh U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. “However, the Eleventh Circuit, back in February, in extending the injunction against the drug testing law, really scrutinized the reasoning behind the law,” said Brock. “So I think they’re going to have a tough time if they go back before the Eleventh Circuit.”

Advancing Human Rights 2013: Dignity. USHRN Biannual National Conference

USHRN Biannual National Conference
Crowne Plaza Atlanta Perimeter at Ravinia
December 6-8, 2013
Atlanta, GA 30339
Azadeh Shahshahani, National Security/Immigrants' Rights Project Director, of the ACLU of Georgia, will be presenting on two workshop/panels.