Reproductive Rights Law Training

July 01, 2014

On June 31, 2014, ACLU law clerks attended the second annual “Atlanta Summer Intern Training on Reproductive Rights Law and Justice,” sponsored by Law Students for Reproductive Justice and hosted by the Feminist Women’s Health Center. The training was an educational and enlightening experience. It was attended by summer law clerks and interns from several legal and advocacy organizations that work to further the reproductive rights of women in Georgia. The four-hour training focused on key reproductive justice issues in Georgia that went well beyond the traditional debate over abortion rights, and included a discussion on the rights of women to give birth with dignity and the obstacles that many women face in accessing much needed health services.

Another state considers discrimination based on ‘religious freedom’

February 25, 2014

By Adam Serwer
msnbc

Georgia is the latest state to consider legislation that could sanction discrimination in the name of religious freedom.

There are two versions of the Georgia bill – a state House version, HB 1023, and a state Senate version, SB 377. Both would affirm the “right to act or refuse to act in a manner substantially motivated by a sincerely held religious tenet or belief whether or not the exercise is compulsory or a central part or requirement of the person’s religious tenets or beliefs.” Where those beliefs conflict with local, state or federal law, the government would have to prove that the law is meant to pursue a “a compelling governmental interest and is the least restrictive means of furthering that compelling governmental interest.”

Walk in My Shoes - Hear Our Voice

February 22, 2014

Roe v Wade 41st Anniversary

January 28, 2014

January 22nd marks the 41st anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that guaranteed reproductive freedom for all women and enhanced the privacy protections of all Americans. While it is unfortunate that reproductive freedom is still under attack 40 years later, we would like you to know that the ACLU and the ACLU of Georgia remain vigilant in our support of reproductive freedom and respect for the personal autonomy of all women.

In the courts...

In 2012, the ACLU of Georgia and the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project filed a lawsuit against the State of Georgia, seeking to prevent the State from implementing a 20-week abortion ban. In December 2012, the Fulton County Superior Court issued an injunction against the law as it applies to pre-viable abortion care and the injunction remains in effect today. By bringing this suit, we prevented this anti-choice law from infringing upon the rights that Georgia women are guaranteed underRoeand we are confident that the Georgia courts will find this law unconstitutional.

Abortion Fight Is Unique To Georgia

May 31, 2013

photo by Rebecca Breyer
Daily Report
May 31, 2013
By Kathleen Baydala Joyner

Opponents of Georgia's ban on most abortions after 20 weeks since fertilization have found comfort—but not strategy—in a federal appeals court's recent ruling against a similar law in Arizona.

Rather than relying on the federal principles that felled Arizona's law, the Georgia plaintiffs argue that the state constitution's right to privacy protects a right to abortion. If it's successful, the challenge could etch a constitutional right to abortion in Georgia that would stand even if the U.S. Supreme Court ever overturns Roe v. Wade.

State Court Temporarily Halts Georgia Abortion Ban

December 26, 2012

State Court Temporarily Halts Georgia Abortion Ban

The Superior Court of Fulton County last Friday temporarily suspended a Georgia law banning pre-viability abortions. The law would have criminalized virtually all abortions starting at 20 weeks of pregnancy, with only an extremely narrow exception for the woman's health.

The American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU of Georgia challenged the law on behalf of three Georgia obstetrician-gynecologists whose patients include women in need of this essential medical care.

“This law places women in harm’s way by depriving them of the right to make their own serious medical decisions,” said Alexa Kolbi-Molinas, staff attorney with the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project. “Politicians should not place ideology over a woman's health."

Although very few abortions occur after 20 weeks, a woman who has an abortion at this point does so for a variety of reasons, including the fact that continuing the pregnancy poses a threat to her health, that the fetus has been diagnosed with a medical condition or anomaly, or that the pregnancy has failed, and miscarriage is inevitable.

“We’re glad that this dangerous, overreaching law has been put on hold,” said Chad Brock, staff attorney with the ACLU of Georgia. “If our elected officials want to help women, they should be passing laws that increase their access to vital health services – not putting them in jeopardy by denying them critical care.”

For more information on this case, please visit: www.aclu.org/reproductive-freedom-womens-rights/lathrop-et-al-v-deal-et-al

Lathrop, et al. v. Deal, et al. - Complaint

Lathrop, et al. v. Deal, et al. - Motion for Injunctive Relief

Lathrop, et al. v. Deal, et al. - Brief in Support of Motion for Injunctive Relief

Lathrop, et al. v. Deal, et al. - Preliminarty Injunction

State Court Temporarily Halts Georgia Abortion Ban

December 26, 2012

State Court Temporarily Halts Georgia Abortion Ban

The Superior Court of Fulton County last Friday temporarily suspended a Georgia law banning pre-viability abortions. The law would have criminalized virtually all abortions starting at 20 weeks of pregnancy, with only an extremely narrow exception for the woman's health.

The American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU of Georgia challenged the law on behalf of three Georgia obstetrician-gynecologists whose patients include women in need of this essential medical care.

“This law places women in harm’s way by depriving them of the right to make their own serious medical decisions,” said Alexa Kolbi-Molinas, staff attorney with the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project. “Politicians should not place ideology over a woman's health."

Although very few abortions occur after 20 weeks, a woman who has an abortion at this point does so for a variety of reasons, including the fact that continuing the pregnancy poses a threat to her health, that the fetus has been diagnosed with a medical condition or anomaly, or that the pregnancy has failed, and miscarriage is inevitable.

“We’re glad that this dangerous, overreaching law has been put on hold,” said Chad Brock, staff attorney with the ACLU of Georgia. “If our elected officials want to help women, they should be passing laws that increase their access to vital health services – not putting them in jeopardy by denying them critical care.”

For more information on this case, please visit: www.aclu.org/reproductive-freedom-womens-rights/lathrop-et-al-v-deal-et-al

Legal Docs
Lathrop, et al. v. Deal, et al. - Complaint

Lathrop, et al. v. Deal, et al. - Motion for Injunctive Relief

Lathrop, et al. v. Deal, et al. - Brief for Support of Motion for Injunctive Relief

Lathrip, et al. v. Deal, et al. - Preliminary Injunction

ACLU Files Lawsuit Challenging Georgia Abortion Ban

December 04, 2012

ACLU Files Lawsuit Challenging Georgia Abortion Ban

The American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU of Georgia filed a lawsuit today challenging a Georgia law banning pre-viability abortions. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of three Georgia obstetrician-gynecologists whose patients include women in need of this essential medical care. The doctors are suing so that they can continue to keep their patients safe.

The law criminalizes virtually all abortions starting at 20 weeks of pregnancy, and contains only the narrowest exception for medical emergencies.

“Politicians should have no say in a woman’s most private medical decisions,” said Alexa Kolbi-Molinas, staff attorney with the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project. “A woman should have the peace of mind of knowing that no matter what unanticipated problems arise during pregnancy, she’ll be able to make the best decision for herself and her family.”

The ban would force a physician caring for a woman with a high-risk pregnancy to wait for her condition to deteriorate until she was in a medical emergency before offering her abortion care to protect her health.

“Our elected officials should be more interested in passing laws that ensure women have access to necessary medical services, not blocking access to them,” said Chad Brock, staff attorney with the ACLU of Georgia. “This law places a woman in danger by limiting her ability to receive urgent care.”

Although very few abortions occur after 20 weeks, a woman who has an abortion at this point does so for a variety of reasons, including the fact that continuing the pregnancy poses a threat to her health, that the fetus has been diagnosed with a medical condition or anomaly, or that the pregnancy has failed, and miscarriage is inevitable.

The full complaint can be seen here.

Plaintiff's Motion for Interlocutory Injunctive Relief can be seen here.

Memorandum of Law in Support of Plaintiff's Motion for Interlocutory Injunctive Relief can be seen here.