UGA athlete policies address sex, appearance and cleanliness

March 27, 2014

11Alive Staff, WXIA

The University of Georgia men's basketball team must follow detailed rules when it comes to dating, as uncovered by the study, shows that Coach Mark Fox includes guidelines on sexual activities, appearances and social networking.

Included under the "Treat women with respect" heading are rules stating "Don't spend all your energy in bed all night," "Hicky's/passion marks should not ever be noticed by coaches" and "One. Not two or three girlfriends."

Social media networking rules state that anything the athletes write can be quote by the coach. Players are forbidden from Twitter unless they have written permission from Coach Fox.

Players are also told that their apartments and dorms are expected to be clean. "We're paying so we're inspecting. I can enter the dorm at any time," the policy states.

Sagging pants and braids are also prohibited, according to the policy.

Police license tag cams draw fire

July 19, 2013

11 Alive
Doug Richards

The patrol car in Acworth was a bit of a trailblazer in 2010. That's when the department mounted three stationary cameras on the rear of the car -- designed to scan traffic, snap still images of license plates, then match the tag number with a national database.

"And it's checking for wanted people, stolen cars, stolen tags, things like that," said Capt. Mark Cheatham.

They're called "license plate recognition" systems or LPRs, and they're increasingly becoming fixtures on police vehicles across the country. Acworth police say they have retained in a database every image taken by their LPR system, including the time and location of each image.

That includes the vast majority of images that have never produced a police investigation.

"All the information is kept in house," said Cheatham. "And should there be a need to look and see if we've ever had contact with a specific vehicle, then we can research that." Cheatham says the police images are subject to release under the state Open Records Act.

And that raises questions among critics

"With this technology, it constitutes a significant invasion of our privacy," said Chad Brock, staff attorney for the ACLU of Georgia. "Law enforcement can see what types of ... political events we're attending, what churches we are attending. That creates a whole host of constitutional concerns."

Critics say say the state should put limits on how long police can retain surveillance images that aren't part of active law enforcement investigations. "We do not believe it's acceptable to retain information indefinitely, particularly when you have collected data on innocent individuals," Brock said.

Acworth police counter they are merely gathering images on public streets that anybody can gather -- with camera equipment that's available commercially.

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The ACLU has released a new ACLU report on license plate readers.

July 17, 2013

The ACLU has released the most comprehensive report to date on law enforcement’s use of license plate readers, one of the fastest-proliferating technologies in the government’s surveillance arsenal. Learn about how your movements on the road are being tracked and recorded: www.aclu.org/plates

Sen. Isakson Defends Government Surveillance Program

June 10, 2013

WABE News
Jonathan Shapiro

U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA) is defending the government surveillance program revealed to be gathering call logs from millions of Verizon phone subscribers.

Speaking after a conference in downtown Atlanta, Iskason said it’s been an important tool in preventing terrorist attacks.

“I can’t talk about some of the things that I know with regard to what our security procedures are, but I am satisfied that there’s no violation of the civil rights of an American citizen in there.”

The National Security Agency and others in the intelligence community are authorized to collect the call logs under 2001’s Patriot Act. Congress maintains oversight and federal judges on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court must approve all data requests. In 2011, Congress renewed the Patriot Act for an additional four years.

The ACLU of Georgia's Annual Meeting

September 24, 2012

Save the Date!

Saturday, November 10, 201250th_anniversary_logo.jpgThe ACLU of Georgia's Annual Meeting

State Bar of Georgia Headquarters
Conference Center
104 Marietta Street, NW, Suite 100
Atlanta, GA 30303

9AM-1PM

Join us to meet newly elected members of the Board of Directors
and updates on our current civil liberties issues including:

  • Immigrants' Rights
  • Student & Youth Rights
  • Social Media, Privacy & Technology