UGA athlete policies address sex, appearance and cleanliness

11Alive Staff, WXIA

The University of Georgia men's basketball team must follow detailed rules when it comes to dating, as uncovered by the study, shows that Coach Mark Fox includes guidelines on sexual activities, appearances and social networking.

Included under the "Treat women with respect" heading are rules stating "Don't spend all your energy in bed all night," "Hicky's/passion marks should not ever be noticed by coaches" and "One. Not two or three girlfriends."

Social media networking rules state that anything the athletes write can be quote by the coach. Players are forbidden from Twitter unless they have written permission from Coach Fox.

Players are also told that their apartments and dorms are expected to be clean. "We're paying so we're inspecting. I can enter the dorm at any time," the policy states.

Sagging pants and braids are also prohibited, according to the policy.

Privacy of Students Targeted for Military Recruitment

With the start of the school year, the ACLU Foundation of Georgia has sent a letter to Georgia’s State School Superintendent, Dr. Barge, asking for protection of privacy rights of Georgia’s high school students who take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (“ASVAB”) test. The ASVAB test is the military's entrance exam, given to recruits to determine their aptitude for military occupations. Even without a student’s or parent’s consent, the ASVAB test may be used to send highly sensitive information about a student to the military for purposes of recruitment. After the administration of the ASVAB test, military representatives may directly communicate with youth to suggest military career paths, based on the individualized profiles ascertained from their test data.

According to records obtained by the National Coalition to Protect Student Privacy, Georgia schools have one of the worst records nationally in protecting the privacy of students taking the ASVAB test. In its letter, the ACLU of Georgia asks that a state-wide policy that requires schools to protect such information be adopted in Georgia

Read the Letter Here